Is America Directly Involved in Yemen War?

By

Martin Cowen

A voter responded to one of my many Yemen posts as follows: “We are not directly involved in this war.”

My response:

It is difficult to determine the extent of America’s involvement in foreign wars and the USA is involved in many. Some readers will recall the deaths of four soldiers in Niger last fall (October 4, 2017) and the response of one U.S. Senator to the effect: Who knew we were in Niger?[i]

America has thousands of troops in Africa.[ii]

The question, though, is: What is America’s involvement in Yemen? Yemen is not in Africa, though it is close (about 20 miles away across the Bal-el-Mandeb strait).

Congress believes America is involved in Yemen and there are pending resolutions in the House and Senate demanding that the President withdraw our troops from Yemen.

H.Con.R. 138 says:

(b) Removal Of Armed Forces.—Pursuant to section 5(c) of the War Powers Resolution (50 U.S.C. 1544(c)), Congress hereby directs the President to remove United States Armed Forces from hostilities in the Republic of Yemen, except United States Armed Forces engaged in operations authorized under the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public Law 107–40; 50 U.S.C. 1541 note), not later than 30 days after the date of the adoption of this concurrent resolution unless and until a declaration of war or specific authorization for such use of United States Armed Forces has been enacted into law.

S.J.Res. 54 says:

SECTION 1. REMOVAL OF UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES FROM HOSTILITIES IN THE REPUBLIC OF YEMEN THAT HAVE NOT BEEN AUTHORIZED BY CONGRESS.

Pursuant to section 1013 of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985 (50 U.S.C. 1546a) and in accordance with the provisions of section 601(b) of the International Security Assistance and Arms Export Control Act of 1976 (Public Law 94–329; 90 Stat. 765), Congress hereby directs the President to remove United States Armed Forces from hostilities in or affecting the Republic of Yemen, except United States Armed Forces engaged in operations directed at al Qaeda or associated forces, by not later than the date that is 30 days after the date of the adoption of this joint resolution (unless the President requests and Congress authorizes a later date), and unless and until a declaration of war or specific authorization for such use of United States Armed Forces has been enacted.

I have written about the history of the War in Yemen in a separate essay to be found on my www.cowenforcongress.com web site.

In this writing I will cite to various newspaper stories about America’s involvement.

  • A very recent horror is the attack upon a school bus full of young boys on or about August 9, 2018, in the Sa’dah region of Yemen (northwest corner, bordering Saudi Arabia.[iii] The weapon used was U.S. supplied, “a 500-pound (227 kilogram) laser-guided MK 82 bomb made by Lockheed Martin, one of the top US defense contractors.”
  • The New York Times ran a story with this headline on May 3, 2018: Army Special Forces Secretly Help Saudis Combat Threat From Yemen Rebels.[iv]
  • In September, 2018, CNN produced an Exclusive Report entitled: Made in America, connecting various attacks resulting in civilian deaths to American weapons.[v] The image is not from the same story.
  • President Trump’s first overseas visit was to Saudi Arabia on May 20, 2017.[vi] A $110 billion arms deal was concluded. Trump cited this arms deal as a reason for his reluctance to sanction Saudi Arabia for the murder of Washington Post journalist Khashoggi.[vii]
  • An attack by a white phosphorus weapon (likely made in America) resulted in the injury of this young girl from Sana’a, the capitol of Yemen.

  • On November 25, 2016, WikiLeaks posted this report: WikiLeaks Drops Yemen Files,Unmasks Washington’s Bloody Role. The short article should be read in its entirety, but here is an extract:
    • The so-called “Yemen Files” appears to show how the Yemeni government received military hardware from the U.S., including aircraft, vehicles and vessels, as well the Yemeni procurement of US biometric systems.
      WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said that in the rarely reported conflict “the United States government has provided most of the bombs and is deeply involved in the conduct of the war itself,” in a statement on the organization’s website.

      Wikileaks said that the war in Yemen was largely strategic, with the country sitting at an important “narrow choke point” for oil trade passing through the Middle East.

The U.S. Government has secrets to keep and it is trying to keep the Yemeni War crimes secret.


[i] https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/10/20/everything-we-know-about-the-niger-attack-that-left-4-u-s-soldiers-dead/?utm_term=.2d63352e43fc

[ii] https://www.newsweek.com/how-many-troops-does-us-have-africa-top-senators-didnt-know-military-was-niger-690937

[iii] https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/13/middleeast/yemen-children-school-bus-strike-intl/index.html

[iv] https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/03/us/politics/green-berets-saudi-yemen-border-houthi.html

[v] https://www.cnn.com/interactive/2018/09/world/yemen-airstrikes-intl/index.html

[vi] https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/05/trump-arrives-saudi-arabia-foreign-trip-170520063253596.html

[vii] https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/12/politics/trump-khashoggi-saudi-arabia-arms-deal-sanctions/index.html

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